BA Sword presented during Summer Parade

  • Author: admin
  • Date: Friday 3rd September 2010
BA Sword presented during Summer Parade BA Sword presented during Summer Parade BA Sword presented during Summer Parade

On completion of the inspection at the Summer Term Passing Out Parade the Britannia Association Sword was awarded to Sub Lieutenant Ross Morrison. The annual sword presentation by the BA is made to the Cadet who has displayed enthusiasm and commitment, showing the most improvement in overall performance while in training. This year the sword had been donated by BA member Lieutenant (ret) Richard Corless who joined the Royal Navy in 1944 and attended the parade to make the presentation.   

 

The Young Officers and Officer Cadets of Britannia Royal Naval College assembled on a sun-drenched parade ground in late July for inspection by Vice Admiral Charles Montgomery, the recently appointed Second Sea Lord. With families and friends looking on, the eight ‘Passing Out’ platoons coped well in the baking heat. The Royal Marine Band, Plymouth under the direction of Captain Richard Long was in attendance playing a variety of music and many stirring marches too. A sea harrier majestically roared up the Dart valley and over the parade in salute too.

 

Other awards during the parade included a letter of commendation to BA member Lieutenant Commander Tom Suddes on his retirement from the RN after 46 years of service and The Church of Scotland and Free Churches Chaplain, Rev Mike Meachin, received his Afghanistan Campaign medal. Mike carried out a three month tour in theatre returning to BRNC only two weeks before the parade.

 

In his address to the assembled parade, Vice Admiral Montgomery congratulated everyone on the display of commitment and the sense of achievement. He recognised the phenomenal contribution and significant influence of the BRNC Staff Officers on the cadets, achieved in such a short time all due to their dedication, sense of values and standards. He also gave a sincere thank-you to the families reminding them and Officers on parade on the importance of their support on the path to success.

                                                                                                                                                                                   

 

The ceremonial march past, around the ramps of the parade ground brings all the platoons into close proximity with the bystanders. Focussed on the parade orders the young men and women either then leave the arena or, if they are part of the eight platoons passing out, they march back onto the parade ground to ‘advance in review order’. Sixteen paces and a smart salute later they are then ready for the traditional slow march up the steps and in through the main doors of the college. Once that door had slammed there was an impressive cheer that went up inside the building greeted by those outside with a round of applause.  

                                                                                                                                                                                   

 

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